The speaker at our meeting on August 3rd 2016 was David Barrington

David has been a member of the Lilium Society for about 20 years. During this time he took on the position of President. His term was before our name changed to the wider "Lilium and Bulb Society".
At 15 years of age, he began working at the Cleland Wildlife Park, and during his working life spent 34 years with the Parks and Wildlife department, rising to the position of Director of Regional Conservation.
He's always had an abiding interest in plants and birds, and has always had appropriate gardens.
In retirement, David and his wife Linda have a large (3 acre) garden in the Adelaide hills town of Bridgewater.
In a very low key and "chatty" presentation style, David talked about his current gardening interests, admitting that he has no favourite plants (he loves them all), but somehow we all went away with the impression that he currently is rather "taken" with Hellebores, having great numbers of them in his large garden.
He also said that he has a tendency to gravitate to good secondhand establishments when looking for gardening tools. He showed us his favourite hoe (a three pronged one - reduced to one). Obviously used to scarify large areas containing small plants that must be hoed around.
His Stable fork (after many years now somewhat reduced in length) is a constant companion, used for moving large quantities of mulch around the garden. He prefers not to use new stainless steel gardening forks, as he says that he finds it too easy to snap prongs off them.
He tends to shy away from animal manures because of the large number of weed seeds that they introduce, favouring chicken or pigeon manure of Neutrog "Rapid Raiser".
Carefully applied, he says that Glyphosate is the only way to be rid of Oxalis weed (specially in paths), and while on the subject of paths, he says that they make great compost beds!!
Paths that have been heavily mulched, after 18 month to 2 years, will convert it to great compost. The compost can then be moved into garden beds, and the paths re-covered with thick mulch.


Click below to hear David's full presentation (minus video!)

David has been a member of the Lilium Society for about 20 years. During this time he took on the position of President. His term was before our name changed to the wider "Lilium and Bulb Society".
At 15 years of age, he began working at the Cleland Wildlife Park, and during his working life spent 34 years with the Parks and Wildlife department, rising to the position of Director of Regional Conservation.
He's always had an abiding interest in plants and birds, and has always had appropriate gardens.
In retirement, David and his wife Linda have a large (3 acre) garden in the Adelaide hills town of Bridgewater.
In a very low key and "chatty" presentation style, David talked about his current gardening interests, admitting that he has no favourite plants (he loves them all), but somehow we all went away with the impression that he currently is rather "taken" with Hellebores, having great numbers of them in his large garden.
He also said that he has a tendency to gravitate to good secondhand establishments when looking for gardening tools. He showed us his favourite hoe (a three pronged one - reduced to one). Obviously used to scarify large areas containing small plants that must be hoed around.
His Stable fork (after many years now somewhat reduced in length) is a constant companion, used for moving large quantities of mulch around the garden. He prefers not to use new stainless steel gardening forks, as he says that he finds it too easy to snap prongs off them.
He tends to shy away from animal manures because of the large number of weed seeds that they introduce, favouring chicken or pigeon manure of Neutrog "Rapid Raiser".
Carefully applied, he says that Glyphosate is the only way to be rid of Oxalis weed (specially in paths), and while on the subject of paths, he says that they make great compost beds!!
Paths that have been heavily mulched, after 18 month to 2 years, will convert it to great compost. The compost can then be moved into garden beds, and the paths re-covered with thick mulch.


Click below to hear David's full presentation (minus video!)