Marg Jenkins on growing bearded irises

Marg Jenkins, for some time was a breeder of Irises. She still has a large selection of them growing in her garden, however she now has moved on to Japanese Water Irises.
She also grows a range of Liliums and a wide selection of other bulbous plants, many of which can be seen below the irises on this page.
Tall bearded irises are one of the easiest plants to grow.
Irises come in a wide variety of colours with the exception of true red however some of the blended colours are approaching red.
Modern iris breeders have greatly increased the range of patterns and blends and colours with bitones, bicolours and tricolours very popular.
Plicatas with one or more colours sanded or striped over the base colour are very striking.
Newer cultivars have changed in form from the simple shapes of the species to heavily ruffled and laced confections which are much more robust and trouble free to grow.
They grow happily in soils from heavy clay right through to non wetting white sand but give the best results in well drained loams.
In South Australia’s hot climate it is best to lightly cover the rhizome with soil to prevent sunburn.
Full sun to part shade are the preferred positions but some of the darker varieties do well in light shade.
At planting time use a seaweed based fertilizer to get them started and give a balanced fertilizer including potash in early spring.
To split a large clump, dig the whole plant, select the biggest fans to replant and discard the central rhizomes.
Trim the leaves and roots back and plant in prepared soil.
Excess plants can be given away or taken to garden club to share with other gardeners.

Marg Jenkins, for some time was a breeder of Irises. She still has a large selection of them growing in her garden, however she now has moved on to Japanese Water Irises.
She also grows a range of Liliums and a wide selection of other bulbous plants, many of which can be seen below the irises on this page.
Tall bearded irises are one of the easiest plants to grow.
Irises come in a wide variety of colours with the exception of true red however some of the blended colours are approaching red.
Modern iris breeders have greatly increased the range of patterns and blends and colours with bitones, bicolours and tricolours very popular.
Plicatas with one or more colours sanded or striped over the base colour are very striking.
Newer cultivars have changed in form from the simple shapes of the species to heavily ruffled and laced confections which are much more robust and trouble free to grow.
They grow happily in soils from heavy clay right through to non wetting white sand but give the best results in well drained loams.
In South Australia’s hot climate it is best to lightly cover the rhizome with soil to prevent sunburn.
Full sun to part shade are the preferred positions but some of the darker varieties do well in light shade.
At planting time use a seaweed based fertilizer to get them started and give a balanced fertilizer including potash in early spring.
To split a large clump, dig the whole plant, select the biggest fans to replant and discard the central rhizomes.
Trim the leaves and roots back and plant in prepared soil.
Excess plants can be given away or taken to garden club to share with other gardeners.