Help wanted

This page has been produced to permit members to ask questions of the Society experts. If you have a question, then send an email to the webmaster so that your question can be published. Replies should also be routed via the webmaster.

Member's question

Our first question comes from member Helen Fairweather. New to propagating liliums, Helen wants to know if the seedlings (Burning Bright) displayed in the first row below, have a virus or not. They were grown from bulbils from a healthy parent. Only some of the seedlings exhibit the curious new growth distortion.

Expert's reply


Marg Jenkins says "You have some healthy aphids munching the tips."
(See the right most image for an enlargement!)

Member's question

At the annual christmas wind-up and member's competition, a lady came up to me with a CD containing images of two plants that she was trying to identify.
While we wait for an expert reply, maybe she could contact me (use the contact webmaster form please) with her name etc. as I was so busy with another conversation, that I forgot to take her details!
Image 6, 7, 8 are the same plant, as are Image 9 and 10.

Expert's reply


Member's question

Marg Jenkins wants to know what is causing this OT Lilium to produce a "blind flower stem". It only has tiny aborted buds!

Expert's reply

Martin Fidge says... "I've been wanting to know the answer to marg's question too, even asking other growers in Tassie, but the answer is normally a shrug of the shoulders, and a reply that they sometimes do it. I've got some that seem to do it more often, and I recon some never are right again..... So who knows."

Member's question

Helen Fairweather would like to know if anyone recognises this flower (above, right)
It appears to be a Hymenocallis - possibly narcissifolia, but the perianth on that is reputed to be about 70mm long, whereas on this specimen they are more like 40mm long. The total flower cluster is 8 or 9, but not all at the same time. No leaves have yet appeared. Our books say that it can be deciduous or evergreen.
Almost all of the species that we have seen documented are larger than ours - the perianth length supposedly ranges between 50 and 120mm, but ours is more like 40mm. Do we have a miniature?

Expert's reply

(Jamus Stonor)
Morning Rob (and Helen), just browsing through the webpage and came across Helen’s question. I think the plant in your picture is a Pancratium, maritimum is the most commonly seen but canariense is kicking around too. What do you think?


Reply:
Thanks Jamus,  It was originally obtained from the raffle table at the Strath Garden club and was supposedly a Sea Daffodil, so we think your suggestion is correct.