Matt Coulter talking about his 2018 Scandinavian Botanic garden tour

Matt is the Horticultural Curator and Plant propagator at the Botanic Gardens of South Australia


Three gardens were covered in his presentation, however only a few of the views have been reproduced here because of the large quantity of work discussed.

Norway:- Bergen, Tromso Botanic Garden

Sweden:- Drottingholm, Stockholm Botanic Garden, The Linnaeus Garden Uppsala, The University of Uppsala Botanic Garden, The Garden Society of Gothenburg Garden, Gothenburg Botanic Garden

Denmark:- Rosenborg Castle & Garden, University of Copenhagen Botanic Garden, Bibliotekshaven Copenhagen, Christianborgs Palace Copenhagen, Tivoli Gardens Copenhagen


Tromso Botanic Garden
The world's northernmost botanic garden with Arctic, Antarctic and Alpine plants from all continents. Traditional perennials and herbs from Northern Norway. 
The flowering season normally starts during the first days of May, while there is still quite a bit of snow in depressions of the Garden. At this time, the purple saxifrage (Saxifraga oppositifolia) and its relatives, as well as yellow cushion plants (whitlow grasses/Draba), pasqueflowers (Pulsatilla) and various bulbs dominate.
Flowering continues until snow arrives, normally some time into October. Some gentian species continue flowering even after a couple of weeks of October snow. The autumn sees even beautiful colours, such as the pink or white berries of shrubby rowan (Sorbus) species contrasting their reddish foliage.

The Collections:-
The Tromso Garden includes 25 collections, including a recently initiated peonarium. Most of them have impressive selections of species, which you would have to do much searching to find elsewhere.
Arctic collection forms a centre around the tallest hill. Himalaya and South America are also large ones. The Garden even has a separate African collection, including plants that survive a Tromsø winter without protection.
Some collections are defined systematically according to plant families, and those of saxifrages, primulas and gentians are particularly rich in species.
A large North Norwegian Tradition Garden with almost 700 plants brought in from old gardens of North Norway.

Gothenburg Botanic Garden
The Garden’s total area is 175 hectares (about 430 acres), most of which is a nature reserve and includes the Arboretum. The garden proper is about 40 hectares (almost 99 acres) with something like 16,000 different species and cultivars in various parts of it.
Among many fascinating parts of the garden are the Rhododendron Valley, the Japanese Dell and the Rock Garden with its waterfall. In the Greenhouses you will find about 4,000 different species and cultivars, including some 1,500 orchids
The garden was first opened to the public in 1923. Before that, a country estate with widespread meadowlands surrounded by magnificent hills and forests formed a rural idyll here. A Nature Reserve since 1975, this wild area today constitutes the most extensive acreage of the garden
The botanist and explorer Carl Skottsberg was specially chosen for the assignment of founding a botanical garden in Gothenburg. Right from the beginning, education and scientific research have been essential aspects of the gardens work, likewise horticulture and recreation.
Since 1936, Botaniska has actively collaborated with the University of Gothenburg, currently playing an important role as a garden for research and excursions. Green Rehabilitation are yet other vital components of Botaniska’s daily work
Gothenburg is featured on the botanical world map for several reasons, not least of which is its collection of bulb and tuber plants, all gathered in their wild habitats. The internationally famous Rock Garden with its glittering waterfall is ravishing.

The Begonia collection:-
The Gothenburg Begonia collection in the Botanical Garden comprises about 100 species and cultivars, including the Begonia masoniana (iron crossbegonia) from New Guinea, the Begonia foliosa from Ecuador and the Begonia manicata from Mexico. Some well-known hybrids can also be enjoyed, like the Begonia x erythrophylla, the Begonia x ricinfolia and the Begonia albopicta.
The climate in this greenhouse is subtropical with a winter temperature of about 15°C. Apart from the approximately 150 species and cultivars in the Begonia collection, important crop plants like rice, cotton, ironwood (lignum vitae) and coffee grow here.
Climate change is rendering Dionysia plants extremely vulnerable. Rising temperatures and dryer climates are stressful for highly specialised Dionysia alpine cushions. They can only escape upwards in principle and when the mountain reaches its limit, all that remains of which the collection is a shining example, is so-called "ex situ" conservation.
The collection contains 35-40 species and is used as a refence collection, among others by Magnus Lidén, the current world authority on Dionysia. The Gothenburg Botanical Garden participated in two trips to Iran in the early 2000s, and witnessed the discovery of four new species.

…………………………

Matt Coulter talking about his 2018 Scandinavian Botanic garden tour

Matt is the Horticultural Curator and Plant propagator at the Botanic Gardens of South Australia


Three gardens were covered in his presentation, however only a few of the views have been reproduced here because of the large quantity of work discussed.

Norway:- Bergen, Tromso Botanic Garden

Sweden:- Drottingholm, Stockholm Botanic Garden, The Linnaeus Garden Uppsala, The University of Uppsala Botanic Garden, The Garden Society of Gothenburg Garden, Gothenburg Botanic Garden

Denmark:- Rosenborg Castle & Garden, University of Copenhagen Botanic Garden, Bibliotekshaven Copenhagen, Christianborgs Palace Copenhagen, Tivoli Gardens Copenhagen


Tromso Botanic Garden
The world's northernmost botanic garden with Arctic, Antarctic and Alpine plants from all continents. Traditional perennials and herbs from Northern Norway. 
The flowering season normally starts during the first days of May, while there is still quite a bit of snow in depressions of the Garden. At this time, the purple saxifrage (Saxifraga oppositifolia) and its relatives, as well as yellow cushion plants (whitlow grasses/Draba), pasqueflowers (Pulsatilla) and various bulbs dominate.
Flowering continues until snow arrives, normally some time into October. Some gentian species continue flowering even after a couple of weeks of October snow. The autumn sees even beautiful colours, such as the pink or white berries of shrubby rowan (Sorbus) species contrasting their reddish foliage.

The Collections:-
The Tromso Garden includes 25 collections, including a recently initiated peonarium. Most of them have impressive selections of species, which you would have to do much searching to find elsewhere.
Arctic collection forms a centre around the tallest hill. Himalaya and South America are also large ones. The Garden even has a separate African collection, including plants that survive a Tromsø winter without protection.
Some collections are defined systematically according to plant families, and those of saxifrages, primulas and gentians are particularly rich in species.
A large North Norwegian Tradition Garden with almost 700 plants brought in from old gardens of North Norway.

Gothenburg Botanic Garden
The Garden’s total area is 175 hectares (about 430 acres), most of which is a nature reserve and includes the Arboretum. The garden proper is about 40 hectares (almost 99 acres) with something like 16,000 different species and cultivars in various parts of it.
Among many fascinating parts of the garden are the Rhododendron Valley, the Japanese Dell and the Rock Garden with its waterfall. In the Greenhouses you will find about 4,000 different species and cultivars, including some 1,500 orchids
The garden was first opened to the public in 1923. Before that, a country estate with widespread meadowlands surrounded by magnificent hills and forests formed a rural idyll here. A Nature Reserve since 1975, this wild area today constitutes the most extensive acreage of the garden
The botanist and explorer Carl Skottsberg was specially chosen for the assignment of founding a botanical garden in Gothenburg. Right from the beginning, education and scientific research have been essential aspects of the gardens work, likewise horticulture and recreation.
Since 1936, Botaniska has actively collaborated with the University of Gothenburg, currently playing an important role as a garden for research and excursions. Green Rehabilitation are yet other vital components of Botaniska’s daily work
Gothenburg is featured on the botanical world map for several reasons, not least of which is its collection of bulb and tuber plants, all gathered in their wild habitats. The internationally famous Rock Garden with its glittering waterfall is ravishing.

The Gothenburg Begonia collection:-
The Gothenburg Begonia collection in the Botanical Garden comprises about 100 species and cultivars, including the Begonia masoniana (iron crossbegonia) from New Guinea, the Begonia foliosa from Ecuador and the Begonia manicata from Mexico. Some well-known hybrids can also be enjoyed, like the Begonia x erythrophylla, the Begonia x ricinfolia and the Begonia albopicta.
The climate in this greenhouse is subtropical with a winter temperature of about 15°C. Apart from the approximately 150 species and cultivars in the Begonia collection, important crop plants like rice, cotton, ironwood (lignum vitae) and coffee grow here.
Climate change is rendering Dionysia plants extremely vulnerable. Rising temperatures and dryer climates are stressful for highly specialised Dionysia alpine cushions. They can only escape upwards in principle and when the mountain reaches its limit, all that remains of which the collection is a shining example, is so-called "ex situ" conservation.
The collection contains 35-40 species and is used as a refence collection, among others by Magnus Lidén, the current world authority on Dionysia. The Gothenburg Botanical Garden participated in two trips to Iran in the early 2000s, and witnessed the discovery of four new species.

…………………………