Alan O'Leary - Growing bulbs from seed

Alan O'Leary - Growing bulbs from seed

When I contacted Alan about the possibility of an article for this page, he said - "I’m still busy potting up etc at my container ranch”. He went on to say…

"I put together a small article with pics –"

Interesting outcomes that can arise growing bulbs from seeds.

One of the many advantages in growing bulbs and other plants from seeds is the natural variation that can results amongst the offspring.
Sometimes it’s for the worse but also can lead to improvements, for example – more robust plants, bigger flowers, different colour flowers, leaf shape and variegation.

Here are a few examples.
A friend in Sydney has grown from seed 3000 plants of Hippeastrum aulicum, a red flowered bulb from Brazil. (see pic)
Among the sea of red during the flowering season he spotted one plant that had pink flowers. I was lucky to get an offset from it. (see pic).
There’s interesting variation in the reds too.

A grower I know in Melbourne grew a Clivia from seed that’s called a Chimera. The flowers on one side of the flower stalk are a different colour to those on the other side (see pic).
It’s quite astonishing .

Many of us grow the South African bulb Veltheimia bracteata, it’s easy to grow in the cooler months and has pink flowers.
Seed grown plants have now appeared with yellow, peach and even bicolor flowers.
It’s not only flower colour, there are now variegated leaves as well. (see pic)

We all need to grow more seed.

When I contacted Alan about the possibility of an article for this page, he said - "I’m still busy potting up etc at my container ranch”. He went on to say…

"I put together a small article with pics –"

Interesting outcomes that can arise growing bulbs from seeds.

One of the many advantages in growing bulbs and other plants from seeds is the natural variation that can results amongst the offspring.
Sometimes it’s for the worse but also can lead to improvements, for example – more robust plants, bigger flowers, different colour flowers, leaf shape and variegation.

Here are a few examples.
A friend in Sydney has grown from seed 3000 plants of Hippeastrum aulicum, a red flowered bulb from Brazil. (see pic)
Among the sea of red during the flowering season he spotted one plant that had pink flowers. I was lucky to get an offset from it. (see pic).
There’s interesting variation in the reds too.

A grower I know in Melbourne grew a Clivia from seed that’s called a Chimera. The flowers on one side of the flower stalk are a different colour to those on the other side (see pic).
It’s quite astonishing .

Many of us grow the South African bulb Veltheimia bracteata, it’s easy to grow in the cooler months and has pink flowers.
Seed grown plants have now appeared with yellow, peach and even bicolor flowers.
It’s not only flower colour, there are now variegated leaves as well. (see pic)

We all need to grow more seed.