Miniature bulbs that you might like to try

Freesia viridis (Aiton) Goldblatt & J.C.Manning, syns. Anomatheca viridis and Lapeirousia viridis (Aiton) L.Bolus grows from 10 to 30 cm high with 4 to 8 suberect or rarely prostrate variable leaves and a deflexed spike of green flowers strongly flushed with brown or maroon. The stem is unusual in that it is flattened and 2-winged, usually simple but with up to five branches. It is distributed through the western coastal winter rainfall areas from Namibia to north of Cape Town in the southwestern Cape. It is found in a variety of habitats and soils from stony clay and limestone to occasionally sandstone and flowers winter into spring (May to August, rarely to October). Some populations are unscented during the day and rose scented at night. Leaves are bitter which may make it unpalatable to animals and has allowed it to persist in overgrazed veld. This is more of a collector's plant. In captivity it sets seed very readily since it is self-fertile and can spread itself to other pots if not watched carefully.

Romulea tetragona (M.P.de Vos) is found in clay soils in dry areas of the winter rainfall Cape and blooms in late winter. The distinctive identifying trait are the leaves which have the lateral ribs reduced and medium ribs widened to form 4 longitudinal wings (the Greek derived name means four angled). The other species showing this trait is Romulea hirta which has different colored flowers. This species is violet-rose to lilac or rarely salmon-pink with a violet or greenish yellow cup and a violet blotch or band in the throat.

Chamaescilla corymbosa is found in damp sandy areas or rock in South Australia, Western Australia, New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania in a variety of habitats: forest, woodland, heath. This species is 10 to 15 cm high. The bright blue star-like flowers have six tepals 8 to 10 mm long and grow on branched stems. They only last a day. Leaves are bluish green, arranged in a flat rosette in exposed places, but longer and erect in shaded conditions. There are three accepted varieties.

Note:- The information (above) has been reproduced from the Pacific Bulb Society's web site, however all photographs displayed on this page are of specimens grown locally by Lilium and Bulb Society members Marg Jenkins and Helen Fairweather.

Miniature bulbs that you might like to try

Freesia viridis (Aiton) Goldblatt & J.C.Manning, syns. Anomatheca viridis and Lapeirousia viridis (Aiton) L.Bolus grows from 10 to 30 cm high with 4 to 8 suberect or rarely prostrate variable leaves and a deflexed spike of green flowers strongly flushed with brown or maroon. The stem is unusual in that it is flattened and 2-winged, usually simple but with up to five branches. It is distributed through the western coastal winter rainfall areas from Namibia to north of Cape Town in the southwestern Cape. It is found in a variety of habitats and soils from stony clay and limestone to occasionally sandstone and flowers winter into spring (May to August, rarely to October). Some populations are unscented during the day and rose scented at night. Leaves are bitter which may make it unpalatable to animals and has allowed it to persist in overgrazed veld. This is more of a collector's plant. In captivity it sets seed very readily since it is self-fertile and can spread itself to other pots if not watched carefully.

Romulea tetragona (M.P.de Vos) is found in clay soils in dry areas of the winter rainfall Cape and blooms in late winter. The distinctive identifying trait are the leaves which have the lateral ribs reduced and medium ribs widened to form 4 longitudinal wings (the Greek derived name means four angled). The other species showing this trait is Romulea hirta which has different colored flowers. This species is violet-rose to lilac or rarely salmon-pink with a violet or greenish yellow cup and a violet blotch or band in the throat.

Chamaescilla corymbosa is found in damp sandy areas or rock in South Australia, Western Australia, New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania in a variety of habitats: forest, woodland, heath. This species is 10 to 15 cm high. The bright blue star-like flowers have six tepals 8 to 10 mm long and grow on branched stems. They only last a day. Leaves are bluish green, arranged in a flat rosette in exposed places, but longer and erect in shaded conditions. There are three accepted varieties.

Note:- The information (above) has been reproduced from the Pacific Bulb Society's web site, however all photographs displayed on this page are of specimens grown locally by Lilium and Bulb Society members Marg Jenkins and Helen Fairweather..