What's happening behind the 'GREEN DOOR'

Unfortunately, because of Corona virus control measures, we have cancelled all face-to-face meetings until further notice, so this page is being used as a "kind of" meeting place for members to report on what they've been up to.
(One never knows what's been happening behind the GARDEN GREEN DOOR!)

So… you're being a caring Australian citizen, and are killing time at home and practicing "Social distancing"??
Just how many TV repeats and if you're into commercial TV channels - the never ending and repeating commercials can you stand.
Many of us have taken the opportunity of cleaning up the house and general surrounds - and suddenly are aware of some extra space being available in the garden (if we have one)!
Have you been wondering how long this crippling virus might hang around? Why not take the opportunity of spending time in the garden. Maybe grow some new cheery flowers - or what about some new veggies to reduce the need to visit the supermarket for salad greens - and maybe even grow some bulbs (garlic, onions etc.)
Remember… We love our Liliums and all of the huge range of bulbs available to us… but foremost - we are all gardeners!

Haemanthus coccineus

(Above) Evening sunlight on over 100 Haemanthus coccineus flowers.
(Right) Standing by the kitchen window, looking at 4 freshly cut saltbush hedges.
(Below right) Part of the kitchen veg garden. These garlic were planted only a week ago, just before 6mm or (real) rain. In sight are spuds (top left), Silver beet, rhubarb, chives and parsley.

This area has been sadly ignored over the past 12 months. The watering soak hoses have been "borrowed" from another area, and some of the plants have been moved over the past few days to use some of this available space. (the chives are looking poorly, but I've yet to trim the excess leaves to reduce the plant transplant stress.)
While I've been doing this, Helen has been doing great things in the flower garden - planting many bulbs that have decided to begin shooting, and moving existing plants to better locations (both visually and soil-wise).
All this has been fantastic occupational therapy, and we sleep much better at night (and nap during the day too if required!)

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The image above (Nerine filifolia) is another of the miniatures that we're growing. What you can't see is that these little blooms are in a group of four tubes, shot this way to show what a small group in the ground would look like.
These are currently blooming - (about 25 cm high and shot this morning April 8th).
Nerine "Coconut Ice"
Pink Valotta
The two images above are from Trevor Nottle. The top one is Nerine "Coconut Ice", and the lower one is a pink form of Valotta.
Trevor was in a bit of a hurry when he sent me these, said he was busy planting minature bulbs in the garden before they began shooting. I asked him what they were and received this reply!
Gosh Rob, and Helen, so many miniatures to plant - JENNY, FIRST STANZA, THE PUMPKIN KID, Narcissus obvalaris (Tenby Daffodil) , Petite Boucle, WINTER WALTZ, 6 different hybrid seedlings of Narc fernandesii, 8 different hybrid seedlings of Narc triandrus, LITTLE AZZIE, LITTLE GEM among others.
FIRST STANZA is one of the first available hybrids of Narc. viridiflora so it has v early flowering and strong green colouration in the cup. Some of these came from Col. Drewitt as part of his dispersal of stock prior to closing, FIRST STANZA and the hybrids of Triandrus and Fernandesii came from Lawrence Trevanion *Keira Bulbs, Canberra. And some came from Graham Fleming also of Canberra.
I am waiting on parcels from Hancock's, Shirley and Jane Tonkins, Tim Drewitt and Rod Barwick, Tasmania.
Narcissus viridiflora
Crocus Bowles White
Marg

Keep watching this space for your contribution
(you have sent one haven't you?)

Round Tuit
Salt bush Hedges
Veg garden
Jeffs bulbs
Jeff Boden responded to my request for input from members… He said that he'd taken pity on this potted Velthemia, and planted it in the garden… I responded with "With a pot of that shape you might be excused for smashing it to safely remove the bulbs !"… He answered with "Yes l had to smash the pot, they are doing well in their new spot in the garden. I did not try to separate them."
Now this next bit is a thank you notice to Jeff's wife… he said "Very busy testing my RYOBI chainsaw on a pole… cutting down trees that are hanging over the house. No more blocked gutters Eva is a wiz now on the secateurs lopper and the battery chain saw (and cleaning up after)"
Colchicum
Di
Di Robson sent the two images above. She said…
"I bought some ‘autumn crocus’ at the Stirling market Lilium and bulb stall. They have flowered well. Then I read that one could shift them in flower so I attempted to shift my original lot that are always obscured by hellebore. They have been there for 25, 30 years and I must have planted them deep, or they have made their way down, because they were intent on staying put. I ended up with flowers with long stems, now inside and lasting well."
The newly purchased bulbs produced those in the top image, and flowers from the deeply planted bulbs are in the vase above.
Narcissus viridiflora
Having read with great interest the text provided by Trevor, the reference to his N. viridiflora reminded me that we have a few in pots that have been steadily opening over the past few days, so I dropped a pot into the light tent. Note:- I use the tent enclosure (powered by morning sunlight), because even a slight breeze in the open causes this little flower, supported on it's 33cm scape to wave around all over the place! Isn't it a beauty?



My next entry is the little autumn flowering crocus (see left). Can anybody help me with a name please?
We thought that it was C. Bowles White, but maybe its C. hadriaticus!!
Marg Jenkins reported in today… (Easter Friday)
Recently I was sent a Round Tuit from a fellow gardener, it has been very useful over the last couple of weeks.
Over the last year I have been repotting, or discarding, a lot of potted plants and the empty pots have been multiplying rapidly.
A few years ago my lovely handyman son made me a mobile wash trough for cleaning pots. It has been sitting under the Buddleia since it was used last autumn with the bowl and shelves filling with unwashed pots. The pots also created heaps near the compost heap and under the Buddleia and filled boxes in the garage and pigeon shed. Worst of all was the mountain of pots which grew beside my potting bench until it was blocking access to my tools and fertilizers.
With the help of the round tuit I first washed all the pots in and on the wash trough. These filled my wagon and were left over night to dry before being put away on the shelves allocated to pots.
Each day, except for a couple of days that were too hot, a wagon load has been washed until the final load was finished yesterday. Seven wagon loads of pots, tubes, saucers and trays all clean and put away – except for the two dirty pots I found hiding in a poly box this morning!
The wash trough is now back in its place in the carport sheltering from the elements and holding two pots until there is another lot accumulated.
The tuit is still in good condition so I intend to put it to work on weeding the iris and lilium bed that missed winter weeding last year, and is now an extensive swamp rat village complete with landscaped hills and valleys.
PS. When putting the ‘last’ load of pots away I noticed a box with pond liner on top and investigated. There were 10 dirty seedling trays and about 80 dirty 4” pots in the box – another job for a round tuit.
And now the Tuit has come in handy again…see the images below! We're looking at a very small part of Marg's extensive garden, and for one reason or another, Marg hasn't had an opportunity to get to her weed problem. The trouble compounded with the discovery of some swamp rats in the area (native rats that frequent watercourses in this area). The weeds were so thick that Marg couldn't see where the focus of the infestation was located.
Yesterday she sent me the following message…"Hi Rob, This is the bit of landscaping I uncovered this morning before the rain started."
and I, tongue in cheek, said "Is that where the new freeway is due to go?", and she replied this morning with "I messed some of the roadworks up when I fell through the roof of the tunnel. It was a dual level highway!"
Kerry Dellar says "I am enjoying my tiny garden, cleaning out the weeds, have got excited to see the purple crocuses and am anxiously waiting to see the other bulbs that are just poking leaves up. Am also picking capsicums, basil, broccoli n chilies". (See below)
Kerry Dellar says "I am enjoying my tiny garden, cleaning out the weeds, have got excited to see the purple crocuses and am anxiously waiting to see the other bulbs that are just poking leaves up. Am also picking capsicums, basil, broccoli n chilies". (See below)
Jeff Boden has just woken up again and says…

"Just been to my new lilium garden at St Agnes and as l had a a spare bed l planted a few veges.

I do not know what the plant in the box is but it strikes real easy."

Jeff, I asked Helen, and she thinks that it might be a Salvia, and asks…
"When you're in the St Agnes garden again, could you take a closer photo of it and send a copy to us for ID?"


Jeffs vege plot
This morning (Saturday May 23rd), in between the most welcome rain showers, I decided to tackle our small oxalis infestation, the removal of which has bugged us for the last couple of years. I used a single tyne of a three pronged scarifier to dig down deep. In fact I had to go down about 30cm before I uncovered the pesky bulbs. As can be seen in the left image (below), the Oxalis (escapees from pots) with the large leaves are grouped close together, and are close to a wild oxalis group of plants on the right. Usually, the fleshy nutrient store part of the underground structure (that usually snaps off the root, leaving the parent bulb way down deep, and still in the ground) is missed. In this case, the deep digging uncovered the offending parts.
Let this be a warning to all to take great care when considering introducing plants likely to escape captivity (from pots) and further infest our natural environment (or home gardens)!
I've probably still missed some, and only time will tell! Hopefully some of the cyclamen that are also planted in the area won't be affected!

What's happening behind the 'GREEN DOOR'

Unfortunately, because of Corona virus control measures, we have cancelled all face-to-face meetings until further notice, so this page is being used as a "kind of" meeting place for members to report on what they've been up to.
(One never knows what's been happening behind the GARDEN GREEN DOOR!)

So… you're being a caring Australian citizen, and are killing time at home and practicing "Social distancing"??
Just how many TV repeats and if you're into commercial TV channels - the never ending and repeating commercials can you stand.
Many of us have taken the opportunity of cleaning up the house and general surrounds - and suddenly are aware of some extra space being available in the garden (if we have one)!
Have you been wondering how long this crippling virus might hang around? Why not take the opportunity of spending time in the garden. Maybe grow some new cheery flowers - or what about some new veggies to reduce the need to visit the supermarket for salad greens - and maybe even grow some bulbs (garlic, onions etc.)
Remember… We love our Liliums and all of the huge range of bulbs available to us… but foremost - we are all gardeners!

Haemanthus coccineus

Evening sunlight on over 100 Haemanthus coccineus flowers.

Salt bush hedges

Standing by the kitchen window, looking at 4 freshly cut saltbush hedges.

Veg garden
Part of the kitchen veg garden. These garlic were planted only a week ago, just before 6mm or (real) rain. In sight are spuds (top left), Silver beet, rhubarb, chives and parsley.

This area has been sadly ignored over the past 12 months. The watering soak hoses have been "borrowed" from another area, and some of the plants have been moved over the past few days to use some of this available space. (the chives are looking poorly, but I've yet to trim the excess leaves to reduce the plant transplant stress.)
While I've been doing this, Helen has been doing great things in the flower garden - planting many bulbs that have decided to begin shooting, and moving existing plants to better locations (both visually and soil-wise).
All this has been fantastic occupational therapy, and we sleep much better at night (and nap during the day too if required!)
Nerine filifolia
The image above (Nerine filifolia) is another of the miniatures that we're growing. What you can't see is that these little blooms are in a group of four tubes, shot this way to show what a small group in the ground would look like. These are currently blooming - (about 25 cm high and shot this morning April 8th).
Jeff
Jeff Boden responded to my request for input from members… He said that he'd taken pity on this potted Velthemia, and planted it in the garden… I responded with "With a pot of that shape you might be excused for smashing it to safely remove the bulbs !"… He answered with "Yes l had to smash the pot, they are doing well in their new spot in the garden. I did not try to separate them."
Now this next bit is a thank you notice to Jeff's wife… he said "Very busy testing my RYOBI chainsaw on a pole… cutting down trees that are hanging over the house. No more blocked gutters Eva is a wiz now on the secateurs lopper and the battery chain saw (and cleaning up after)"
Nerine "Coconut Ice"
Pink form of Valotta
The two images above are from Trevor Nottle. The top one is Nerine "Coconut Ice", and the lower one is a pink form of Valotta.
Trevor was in a bit of a hurry when he sent me these, said he was busy planting minature bulbs in the garden before they began shooting. I asked him what they were and received this reply!
Gosh Rob, and Helen, so many miniatures to plant - JENNY, FIRST STANZA, THE PUMPKIN KID, Narcissus obvalaris (Tenby Daffodil) , Petite Boucle, WINTER WALTZ, 6 different hybrid seedlings of Narc fernandesii, 8 different hybrid seedlings of Narc triandrus, LITTLE AZZIE, LITTLE GEM among others.
FIRST STANZA is one of the first available hybrids of Narc. viridiflora so it has v early flowering and strong green colouration in the cup. Some of these came from Col. Drewitt as part of his dispersal of stock prior to closing, FIRST STANZA and the hybrids of Triandrus and Fernandesii came from Lawrence Trevanion *Keira Bulbs, Canberra. And some came from Graham Fleming also of Canberra.
I am waiting on parcels from Hancock's, Shirley and Jane Tonkins, Tim Drewitt and Rod Barwick, Tasmania.
Colchicum
Di
Di Robson sent the two images above. She said…
"I bought some ‘autumn crocus’ at the Stirling market Lilium and bulb stall. They have flowered well. Then I read that one could shift them in flower so I attempted to shift my original lot that are always obscured by hellebore. They have been there for 25, 30 years and I must have planted them deep, or they have made their way down, because they were intent on staying put. I ended up with flowers with long stems, now inside and lasting well."
The newly purchased bulbs produced those in the top image, and flowers from the deeply planted bulbs are in the vase above.
Narcissus viridiflora
Narcissus viridiflora
Having read with great interest the text provided by Trevor, the reference to his N. viridiflora reminded me that we have a few in pots that have been steadily opening over the past few days, so I dropped a pot into the light tent. Note:- I use the tent enclosure (powered by morning sunlight), because even a slight breeze in the open causes this little flower, supported on it's 33cm scape to wave around all over the place! Isn't it a beauty?

My next entry is the little autumn flowering crocus. Can anybody help me with a name please?
We thought that it was C. Bowles White, but maybe its C. hadriaticus!!
Crocus Bowles White
Marg Jenkins reported in today… (Easter Friday)
Recently I was sent a Round Tuit from a fellow gardener, it has been very useful over the last couple of weeks.
Over the last year I have been repotting, or discarding, a lot of potted plants and the empty pots have been multiplying rapidly.
A few years ago my lovely handyman son made me a mobile wash trough for cleaning pots. It has been sitting under the Buddleia since it was used last autumn with the bowl and shelves filling with unwashed pots. The pots also created heaps near the compost heap and under the Buddleia and filled boxes in the garage and pigeon shed. Worst of all was the mountain of pots which grew beside my potting bench until it was blocking access to my tools and fertilizers.
With the help of the round tuit I first washed all the pots in and on the wash trough. These filled my wagon and were left over night to dry before being put away on the shelves allocated to pots.
Each day, except for a couple of days that were too hot, a wagon load has been washed until the final load was finished yesterday. Seven wagon loads of pots, tubes, saucers and trays all clean and put away – except for the two dirty pots I found hiding in a poly box this morning!
The wash trough is now back in its place in the carport sheltering from the elements and holding two pots until there is another lot accumulated.
The tuit is still in good condition so I intend to put it to work on weeding the iris and lilium bed that missed winter weeding last year, and is now an extensive swamp rat village complete with landscaped hills and valleys.
PS. When putting the ‘last’ load of pots away I noticed a box with pond liner on top and investigated. There were 10 dirty seedling trays and about 80 dirty 4” pots in the box – another job for a round tuit.
Marg

Keep watching this space for your contribution
(you have sent one haven't you?)

Stacks Image 246395
And now the Tuit has come in handy again…see the images below! We're looking at a very small part of Marg's extensive garden, and for one reason or another, Marg hasn't had an opportunity to get to her weed problem. The trouble compounded with the discovery of some swamp rats in the area (native rats that frequent watercourses in this area). The weeds were so thick that Marg couldn't see where the focus of the infestation was located.
Yesterday she sent me the following message…"Hi Rob, This is the bit of landscaping I uncovered this morning before the rain started."
and I, tongue in cheek, said "Is that where the new freeway is due to go?", and she replied this morning with "I messed some of the roadworks up when I fell through the roof of the tunnel. It was a dual level highway!"
Kerry Dellar says "I am enjoying my tiny garden, cleaning out the weeds, have got excited to see the purple crocuses and am anxiously waiting to see the other bulbs that are just poking leaves up. Am also picking capsicums, basil, broccoli n chilies". (See below)
Jeff
Jeff Boden has just woken up again and says…

"Just been to my new lilium garden at St Agnes and as l had a a spare bed l planted a few veges.

I do not know what the plant in the box is but it strikes real easy."

Jeff, I asked Helen, and she thinks that it might be a Salvia, and asks…
"When you're in the St Agnes garden again, could you take a closer photo of it and send a copy to us for ID?"

This morning (Saturday May 23rd), in between the most welcome rain showers, I decided to tackle our small oxalis infestation, the removal of which has bugged us for the last couple of years. I used a single tyne of a three pronged scarifier to dig down deep. In fact I had to go down about 30cm before I uncovered the pesky bulbs. As can be seen in the left image (below), the Oxalis (escapees from pots) with the large leaves are grouped close together, and are close to a wild oxalis group of plants on the right. Usually, the fleshy nutrient store part of the underground structure (that usually snaps off the root, leaving the parent bulb way down deep, and still in the ground) is missed. In this case, the deep digging uncovered the offending parts. Let this be a warning to all to take great care when considering introducing plants likely to escape captivity (from pots) and further infest our natural environment (or home gardens)! I've probably still missed some, and only time will tell! Hopefully some of the cyclamen that are also planted in the area won't be affected!

“I sat in the side verandah today and admired the weeds - amazing crop - even the sour sobs were a lovely colour - all gold, and looking beautiful.
I love gold - the look of it - and event feel of it!”


The scene… Mother’s day 2020. Helen is sorting through memorabilia, and finds this treasure amongst her mother’s correspondence. A letter from her great aunt (aged 80+ and living in Ardrossan) to Helen’s grandmother in Strathalbyn.

Perhaps our bulb committee should consider including this much maligned bulb in their offerings for the next sale!

“I sat in the side verandah today and admired the weeds - amazing crop - even the sour sobs were a lovely colour - all gold, and looking beautiful.
I love gold - the look of it - and event feel of it!”

The scene… Mother’s day 2020. Helen is sorting through memorabilia, and finds this treasure amongst her mother’s correspondence. A letter from her great aunt (aged 80+ and living in Ardrossan) to Helen’s grandmother in Strathalbyn.

Perhaps our bulb committee should consider including this much maligned bulb in their offerings for the next sale!

Easter Sunday garden tour
Since everyone is stuck at home eating chocolate eggs (or their equivalent), we decided to take you on a virtual tour of a member's garden. In this case, since we can't get out to tour any other garden.
Helen and I will be wandering around our own garden (and might I add that you need to take it "as-is", since at this time of the year many of the glamorous items have either finished, or not yet shown up!
Helen has been struggling to pot on Society bulbs at the same time that she's trying to plant out her own purchases, so in many areas the garden is looking a bit "tatty". (And the vegetable garden is in the middle of a complete re-work, with 20 year old summer shades having already been demolished - along with three raised beds (wooden sleeper construction) in the process of being removed as the timbers have reached end-of-life".)
The intention is to move towards wicking beds. The first move in this direction can be seen during the tour - a commercial 2m x 1m "VegePod", purchased a couple of weeks ago. (we included some of the salad species produce in our lunch today).
We'll wander from the front gate, under the 140 year old Cyprus hedge, and move through the garden in a clockwise direction.

Easter Sunday garden tour
Since everyone is stuck at home eating chocolate eggs (or their equivalent), we decided to take you on a virtual tour of a member's garden. In this case, since we can't get out to tour any other garden.
Helen and I will be wandering around our own garden (and might I add that you need to take it "as-is", since at this time of the year many of the glamorous items have either finished, or not yet shown up!
Helen has been struggling to pot on Society bulbs at the same time that she's trying to plant out her own purchases, so in many areas the garden is looking a bit "tatty". (And the vegetable garden is in the middle of a complete re-work, with 20 year old summer shades having already been demolished - along with three raised beds (wooden sleeper construction) in the process of being removed as the timbers have reached end-of-life".)
The intention is to move towards wicking beds. The first move in this direction can be seen during the tour - a commercial 2m x 1m "VegePod", purchased a couple of weeks ago. (we included some of the salad species produce in our lunch today).
We'll wander from the front gate, under the 140 year old Cyprus hedge, and move through the garden in a clockwise direction.

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Looking East, North East. The front garden layout reproduces the early 1900 version with two circular beds within an overall rectangle. We've used 19mm gravel instead of lime cement paths to aid in water absorption. The far end is basically Australian natives, while the main garden incorporates mainly low water requirement plants.
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The front path, lined with 8 small Vitex trees/shrubs. They're supposed to be tough, however we're finding that they're struggling with the low water availability. Copious use is made in the garden of succulents, Salvias, Pomegranates and ever increasingly many bulbs.
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As can be seen here, we have many different pomegranate species. They vary from full sized fruiting trees, to small, medium and miniature plants. We have a number of non-fruiting, cream, cream and orange double flowered trees also.
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In this image, one can see a couple of the miniature pomegranates either side of where the path turns off to the right. Pomegranate fruit are ripening fast, and it's a challenge to get our share (we use the luscious seeds in salads) before the birds move in. However there's plenty for all of us!
The Hedge, by the way, is in the order of 150 years old, and measures 40M x 3.6M high x 3.4M thick. The wide path gives access to our mobile scaffold.
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Some of the fruit now ready to pick.
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Moving to the Western end of the hedge, we come to the driveway, and turning right we see what is really an arbor containing (mainly) Manchurian Pears (about 12 of them), and these are also joined by a Jacaranda, a couple of Prunus and a very tall Grevillea robusta.
However, we also grow lots of bulbs here…Clivia nobilis form a guard of honour along the rear pathway, and in the right mid-ground Agapanthas hold the fort.
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Without moving other than looking over our right shoulder, we see one of the non-fruiting Pomegranates right in the corner of the near bed, while along the left path near the house is a row of Salvias that have been struggling this year (parched).
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In the centre foreground is a Velthemia "Lemon Flame", and to the right a stack of mainly white Agapanthas behind which one can see one of the prunus trees.
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Right at the rear left of this image one can see what is left of about 100 Haemanthus flowers (see earlier in the season near the top of this page). We're about to see the big scrappy leaves erupt from the ground - flanked by the Clivias.
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Standing alongside the Haemanthus plot, the Clivias disappear into the distance.
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The driveway now curves left to continue down past the garage. In the distance more greenery under the shade of the Manchurian pears is just visible.
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In the foreground are the remaining Haemanthus (a patch under each tree), while Helen's shade loving pots hide the fence.
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Most of the currently flowering species here at the moment are Begonias.
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One of those currently flowering.
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Continuing past the garage, we pass a series of old sheds. Those viewed above are the remaining cobbled stables that were used to house up to 3 horses.
I recently completed repairs on the front of these sheds, replacing Galv. walling to half height (to stop ingress of dry grass and leaves) and the guttering that had rotted.
(Recycled materials were used for all of this).
The shed on the right is actually constructed from recycled garage doors (a "free-standing" temporary structure), used for housing wheel barrows etc.
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Continuing on from the sheds, on the right we come to the shade house, where private, and Society pots are grown on.
The greenery along the edge is a brilliant little Geranium that has just finished flowering. A "Snail creeper" climbs the shade wall.
In the distance the (yet another) hedge that marks the end of the cultivated areas.
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The shade house in which Society and private pots are housed. This area is permanently "space challenged".
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Turning around to the left, our path wanders into what we call "The Picking Garden". So called because we originally shifted all our roses from the garden now containing the Tree Arbour because it was too shady there. This garden then, probably has our best soil and moisture levels, and so contains liliums etc. The path is lined on the right with Liriopes, curving around a large Chinese Elm, and forking to pass a White cedar as it exits this garden through an arbour covered in Jasmine.
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Crocus Bowles white - flowering on the left, next to the base of the Crepe Myrtle.
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Viewed from the same location as the last image, except looking at the left side of the path. The multitude of tall stakes indicates that lilies live here! In the foreground a clump of Haemanthus albaflos. The Pruned plant on the extreme left is one of a group of five Buddleja which during the summer act as a wind-break and shade from the Western sun.
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Further along the track past the sheds, and past the Shade House, looking to the right we see a large bare piece of ground bound by another hedge (supposedly a windbreak). This ground is full of various Society Narcissi. It's a terror to weed, as I'm not game to use any hoes in case I take off a growing tip!
The plants in the foreground are potted Nerine filifolia.
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A bit closer to the Nerine filifolias
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The North Eastern corner of the Picking Garden.
Not very visible, but hidden in here are several clumps of very dark red lilies, and various Crinums.
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Lilium "Black Charm" was flowering on November 20th 2019. A clump of about a dozen bulbs.
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Crinum Blooming in this area September 2018.
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Turning around we see two quite large compost heaps in various stages. Further behind is an even larger pile of chips (of materials too large to compost). This pile is over 3 times the size of the compost heaps.
Turning around again and looking towards the rear of the house, on the left, and continuing right through to the main road, we have various Australian natives. The ground falls away to the left of these to a (mostly these days) dry creek.
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Standing in the beginning of the native area, looking back to the Picking Garden, high on the left we see another of the Vitex plants that we first saw in the front garden. This one has sufficient water!
To the extreme left we see a bed containing Sprekelia and Ismene festalis.
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The Sprekelia and Ismene (about 50 plants in all).
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Native garden on the left, and various bulbs on the right (last bit of the Picking Garden).
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On the left, the beginning of a path leading down to the creek.
Central area the beginning of the Vegetable garden, with citrus trees to the right.
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The path that leads to the kitchen garden splits here to the Veg garden, with a small Bay tree and bulbs signalling that this bed is basically housing Society bulbs: (Liliums are seen in the left background.)
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Part of the Veg garden closest to the house. Rubarb in the foreground, garlic bed behind it and far right some brassicas and Bok Choi are just germinating
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Continuing past the veg garden takes us to a large brick paved area at the rear of the house. In the mid ground, nestling against the edge of the old underground tank is a succulent garden, and behind that, the newly purchased and planted VegePod.
We hope to grow a lot of our greens and herbs in this (took our first very small harvest from it for lunch today (Easter Sunday).
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Added Monday…At last some of the slow germinators have shown up! We now have Baby beet, Broad leafed rocket, Wild rocket, Coriander, Basil, White radish, Globe radish, Corn salad, Greek oregano, Parsley curline, Salad burnet, Small leaf spinach and Southern European spinach - all above ground and racing.
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One of the succulents flowering at the moment - adding glorious colour.
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Moving back to the Bay tree, here's the group of Nerines planted behind it in full flower. Leaves are just appearing.
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Continuing past the Bay tree to the hedge showing in the distance, we see more hedges! These though are all low water requirement plants - (Saltbush).
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These two Salt Bush hedges run past the dining room and kitchen. The path between them takes us down to the creek to the Eucalypt which was one of the reasons Helen's parents bought the property back in the early 1970's.
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Moving down between the two hedges, we meet a fork, the lower of which leads down the bank to the creek where the Redgum stands.
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The Eucalyptus camaldulensis that sold the property. This is a single tree, forking about 30cm above the ground.
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Moving back to the fork, and turning right we get a glimpse of what we call "The Kitchen garden", under the shade of a 100 year+ olive tree. However we need to backtrack to the start of the two hedges and take the right onto the slate paved area.
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This path eventually leads to the native section of the front garden, but in doing so, passes 3 bird baths and a bird pond.
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If we now take the right side of the tree, we see the smallest of the baths under yet another pomegranate.
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Here we see the second (terracotta) birdbath tucked in under a small acacia that is being overrun by a large Clematis vine.
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The next path turning left takes us past a pot of Japanese Irises and on to the in-ground pond.
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In the far upper background we can just make out a Eucalyptus erythrocorys that has just begun flowering.
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Eucalyptus erythrocorys (Red Cap Gum) close-up.
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A couple of steps further and we're onto the in-ground pond where there's always action, with birds of all sizes gather at all hours of the day.
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Backing up a bit and turning to the hedge, we see the moving force in the garden - still at it!